The Count of the Sahara

Gather ’round Indy Fans. Today we go historical and fantastical with our guest and subject matter. The topic? Count Byron de Prorok, famous archaeologist in 1925 and disgraced scalawag just 6 months later. The Indy Team has hosted many shows illuminating the day-to-day practicalities of archaeology and dismantling the Indiana Jones fable. This week Wayne Turmel joins…

California State Parks: Droughts

California State Parks contain a breadth and depth of cultural resources that are truly impressive. The organization’s tasks range from protecting and preserving natural and cultural resources and involves engagement with tribal groups. On the heels of our interview with Dr. Bond from October 21st, this show about CA State Parks also highlights the threats…

Oh the Horror

It’s that time of year again Indy fans. Have no fear though, this week’s show will not horrify you. If fact, we are going to treat you to some of the anthropological thoughts behind the appeal of horror films. There is not trickery here. The horror film genre is popular. Psychologists cite multiple theories of…

The NPS: Almost 100 Years in the Making

The National Park Service (NPS) is just about to celebrate its 100th anniversary (August 25, 2016). It seems only fitting we take a moment, park it, and take a proverbial hike through its history. The NPS is a land management, preservative, educational, and protective body for the United States parks and historical sites. Joining us today is Dr. Stanley…

Rising Star

(PHOTOGRAPH BY MARK THIESSEN, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC) Some researchers achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust upon them…and some found it after spelunking is the bowels of a cave in South Africa. The news exploded September 10th and the report was out of this world (more accurately beneath it). Currently, more than 1,550 fossil elements have been…

Birds of a feather: Chaco trade and Macaws

Researchers recently conducted radiocarbon tests on the bones of 30 scarlet macaws, originally excavated in 1897, stored at New York’s American Museum of Natural History. Their findings are causing the previous theories about the development of civilization in Mesoamerica to molt away. The macaw skeletons were much older than previously thought. While no one is…

Unbound

Part of the analytical work that goes with archaeology and anthropology is contemplating the interrelatedness of events. For example, scholar consider a surfeit of factors from environmental, to political, to religious, and so on to understand what prompted the collapse of the Mayan empire (which may not have happened at all). We do not necessarily…