More Sex: Studying Sexuality and Gendered Roles in Archaeology

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If last weeks Valentine’s Day show was not satiating enough, this week we have bookended Valentine’s Day with another show dedicated to exposing more sex in archaeology! Sex and sexuality are not new issues. There are multiple instances throughout the archaeological record where materials, art, and other remnants show how people demonstrated their identities.  Dr. Rosemary Joyce joins us to discuss the instances where sexuality and gendered identity show up in the archaeological record and how it is deciphered…or unsheathed.

 

Please welcome our guest this week:

Dr. Rosemary Joyce

Rosemary Joyce, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, and from 2009 to 2014 the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Professor in the Social Sciences, received the PhD from the University of Illinois-Urbana in 1985. A curator and faculty member at Harvard University from 1985 to 1994, she moved to Berkeley in 1994 as Director of the Hearst Museum of Anthropology and a member of the anthropology department. She has been a Fulbright Senior Scholar at the Universidad de Costa Rica, as Astor Visiting Lecturer at Oxford University, and a visiting lecturer at Memorial University (Newfoundland), the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and the Universidad de Barcelona. She has received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, and was a Fellow at Radcliffe University’s Bunting Institute, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, and the University of California Humanities Research Institute in Irvine. In 2011 she was appointed by President Barack Obama to the Federal Cultural Property Advisory Committee.

She is the author of Cerro Palenque: Power and Identity on the Maya Periphery, Gender and Power in Prehispanic Mesoamerica, The Languages of Archaeology, and Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives, and coauthor of Embodied Lives (with Lynn Meskell) and Material Relations (with Julia Hendon and Jeanne Lopiparo). For more than thirty-five years she conducted archaeological fieldwork in Honduras, and currently is collaborating in research with Mexican colleagues while continuing research on Honduran collections in European museums.

 

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